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Psychotherapy for human rights professionals and those working with distressed clients. The Centre for Emotional Health specialises in working with professionals who work with traumatised client groups, including those in humanitarian, human rights, social work and related fields.

Looking after you, whilst you look after others

Working with people who have experienced hardship and abuse can take its toll on your own emotional health. Counselling is a supportive way of maintaining your well-being and ensuring that emotional content generated by your work has an outlet, preventing the build up of tension which can become overwhelming. Counselling can support you to support others and help keep you resilient.

Well being at work

Its important to give yourself the space to reflect on the impact of your work on your emotional life, to prevent burnt out and stress.

Why do I do what I do?

Explore how formative personal experiences relate to the work that we’re attracted to and help make sense of your clients experiences.

 

For more information or to book sessions please contact us on 0208 144 0536 or email beth@centreforemotionalhealth.com.

Nature Based Psychotherapy - CPD Workshops

Nature Based Psychotherapy

Moving your practice into natural settings

5 day CPD Training

29 September – 27 October 2014

The Centre for Emotional Health/Wild in the City! are pleased to announce a series of 5 one day CPD workshops on nature based psychotherapy, aimed at qualified psychotherapists/counsellors and those in training who are considering taking their practice outside.

This training is immersive and will be held in natural settings throughout south London.


The training incorporates the development of our own awareness and connection to nature, anthropological perspectives on the role of nature in our lives, an exploration of emerging theory in the practice of nature based therapy, therapeutic process and practicalities in nature based therapy, boundaries and risks, the use of metaphor and symbolism, experiential learning and the development of practical nature based skills.

The course will be taught through experiential learning, discussion, seminars, case studies, and skills practice.

Course members will be expected to be active participants, willing to work individually, in pairs and as a group. All days will take place in outdoor settings. Please wear clothing appropriate to the weather.

The course will be held between 10am - 5pm on Mondays from 29 September to 30 October 2014. Places for each day are limited to 10. Attendance is subject to an informal interview (by phone) with regard to your training and interests.

Location
The course will be held across three sites in south London, giving experience of different habitats in woodland and park settings; Brockwell Park Community Greenhouses, SE24; Sydenham Hill Woods, SE26, and South Norwood Country Park (SE25). All sites are easily accessible using public transport.

Course Leader
The training will be led by Beth Collier, (MBACP) who is a Nature based Psychotherapist using London's parks and woodlands as therapeutic spaces. Beth founded Wild in the City! in 2013 as a therapeutic organisation supporting emotional well-being through connection to nature.

Cost
The training can be taken as stand alone days or booked as a series, with 6 cpd hours for each day. The investment for the course is £110 per day, £300 for three or £500 for all five in series.

Booking
To book please contact Beth Collier;

Tel: 07906 832 952
Email: beth@centreforemotionalhealth.com

For further information see;  http://www.wildinthecity.org.uk/ or click here to download a pdf version of the course outline.


Workshop content

Day 1 - Nature and Well-being – Moving therapy outside – 29 September (SE24)
Will explore nature and well being, asking why go outside? We will reflect on our own relationship to nature and develop our awareness of the natural world through experiential work. We will consider how working outdoors will be different to working inside and the impact on boundaries, process and practicalities. The day will include discussion, seminars, case studies, experiential learning and the opportunity to practice therapy outdoors.

Day 2 – Natural navigation – Deepening our connection - 6 October (SE24)
Will be an introduction to natural navigation and an exploration of how it can be incorporated into practice to ground therapist and client emotionally and geographically. We will learn natural signs for direction in celestial sphere, plants, animals and the elements and explore how these can guide us in developing an embodied sense of time, direction and place. The day will include discussion, seminars, case studies, experiential learning and the opportunity to practice therapy outdoors.

Day 3 – Emerging theory in Nature Based Psychotherapy - 13 October (SE26)
We will explore emerging theory and frame guiding practice in the outdoors, including person centred use of space, Metaphor and symbolism, Maslow's hierachy of needs, Attachment theory and anthropological perspectives on the natural world and our connection to it, including our own myths and rituals associated with nature. The day will include discussion, seminars, case studies, experiential learning and the opportunity to practice therapy outdoors.

Day 4 – Nature based skills/Bushcraft – 20 October (SE26)
We will be an introduction to nature based skills including an understanding of the psychological differences between 'bushcraft' and 'survival' and how these insights can be brought into nature based work, trauma and survival psychology, fire lighting, safe knife use, water purification, shelter building and cordage making. The day will include discussion, demonstration, seminars, experiential learning and physical tasks.

Day 5 – Working therapeutically with children in nature - 27 October (SE25)
We will explore the role of nature in children's lives today including barriers to access. We will explore theoretical models for working with children outdoors. We will explore ways of engaging children in therapeutic nature based activities. The day will include discussion, seminars, case studies, experiential learning and the opportunity to practice therapy outdoors.


Supported by:

Posted in Latest News on 18/08/2014

Reflective Group for professionals working with distressed clients, 3rd Sept

The group will provide a space for professionals who have contact with people who are in distress or suffering hardship to debrief and explore the emotional impact of their work. Professionals include, but are not limited to; doctors, social workers, teachers, lawyers, humanitarian workers, human rights activists, NGO staff and those in similar fields.

Working with people who have experienced hardship and abuse can take its toll on your own emotional health. The reflective group is a supportive forum to help maintain your well-being and provide an outlet for the emotional content generated by your work, helping to prevent a build up of tension which can feel overwhelming. The group aims to support you in supporting others and help keep you resilient.


The group will be held outdoors in the beautiful gardens of Brockwell Park Community Greenhouses, Herne Hill, London (SE24) and will meet on Wednesdays over 5 weeks from 3rd September to 1st October, between 6.45pm to 8.00pm. Places are limited to 9 and cost £100 (equivalent to £20 a session).


The group will be facilitated by Beth Collier, a nature based psychotherapist who uses London's parks and woodlands as therapeutic spaces. She has worked in the human rights field for 14 years, for the last 6 years she has run a research consultancy working in partnership with UNHCR.


To book or for an informal chat about whether the group is suitable for you contact Beth: beth@centreforemotionalhealth.com/07906 832 952.

For further information please visit www.centreforemotionalhealth.com or www.wildinthecity.org.uk. Click here to download a flyer.

Posted in Latest News on 10/08/2014

Outdoor meditation sessions, Wednesdays 5.15pm

From 16th July 2014 Wild in the City! will be running regular outdoor meditation sessions.

This sensory meditation group will be held in the gardens at Brockwell Park Community Greenhouses and is open to all (adults and children over 13).

 

"Develop your senses and tune into the nurturing and rejuvinating powers of nature. Use your body and nature to calm the mind and reveal emotions."

 

The nature connection meditation will be facilitated by Beth, a psychotherapist using nature as a therapeutic space.

The group meets every Wednesday at 5.15pm until 6pm. Book in advance £5, Drop in £6.  We will meet in all weathers (except high winds), please wear clothing appropriate to the climate.

.

More info: Beth – 07906 832 952

Date/time: Wednesdays 5.15pm – 6.00pm. Starting 16th July 2014

Venue: This is a Wild in the City! event held at Brockwell Park Community Greenhouses, SE24.  BPCG are in the centre of Brockwell Park, between the tennis courts and the Secret Garden – see map below.

Cost: £5 advance, £6 drop in

 

 

Posted in Latest News on 03/07/2014

Outdoor therapeutic group, 'Finding my voice,' starting 16 July 2014

An outdoor therapeutic group for women on the theme of ‘Finding My Voice,’ will be held in the gardens of Brockwell Park Community Greenhouses. The group will meet for 12 sessions starting on 16th July and will run until 1st October 2014.

The group will provide a space for women from diverse backgrounds to reflect on having or not having a voice as a child, as an adult, at home, at school, at work and in society.

Our outdoor setting in a beautiful garden will allow members to engage with all their senses and nature in supporting exploration of voice and expression. The group will offer the opportunity to explore the impact of family and society on us, how we interact with others and behave in relationships and what influences our communication and expression.

We will embrace creativity and the nurturing of voice through listening, speaking, singing, writing and movement as and if it suits individual members. In particular we may use sound meditation and poetry to explore how it feels to give voice to feelings and to be heard.

The group will be facilitated by Beth Collier. Beth is an Integrative Psychotherapist who uses London’s parks and woodland as therapeutic spaces.

To book or for an informal chat about whether this group is suitable for you please contact Beth. All applicants will have an initial one to one session prior to the group starting.  See attached flyer for more information or circulation.

Date: Wednesdays 16th July – 1st October 2014

Time: 6.45pm to 8.00pm

Places: Limited to 10

Cost: £240 (equivalent to £20 a session. Please call for payment options)

Booking/information: Beth Collier, 07906 832 952 or beth@centreforemotionalhealth.com

Posted in Latest News on 03/07/2014

Walk and Talk - Counselling sessions in woodland

Walk and Talk counselling sessions in Sydenham Hill Woods

Traditionally therapy sessions take place within the four walls of a physical room. During a Walk and Talk session the natural environment (woodland/parkland) becomes the therapy room.

 

The natural and changing state of woodland provides a context to help you feel more connected to nature and wildlife, engage your senses and explore feelings. Many people find that the green tranquility of woodland induces a meditative/reflective mood which supports emotional awareness and provides respite from the hustle and bustle of modern life.

To book a session or for further information please visit http://www.centreforemotionalhealth.com/psychotherapy-counselling/walk-and-talk/ or contact Beth;

mob: 07906 832 952

tel: 0208 144 0536

email: beth@centreforemotionalhealth.com

Posted in Latest News on 26/09/2012

Mixed Race Matters - 2nd July 2012

The Centre for Emotional Health is facilitating a reflective session on Monday 2nd July 2012.

Being mixed race is a unique experience which can lead to a rich understanding of race, culture, identity and belonging. This reflective session creates the space to connect with other mixed race people and to share thoughts, feelings and experiences on a range of issues.

The session will follow the themes and discussion raised by its participants, however some example topics we may want to talk about are;

- How you see yourself, how society sees you
- How it feels and what it means to be mixed race
- Labels, which hat fits? Black/Asian/White/Bi-racial/Mixed heritage
- Half and half or whole
- Caught inbetween; family, race and culture
- Belonging; the same but different/Different but the same
- Racism and internalised racism
- Good enough? Compensating for not being white enough/black enough
- Physical appearance, Beauty, Hair, Make up
- Confidence, self esteem, knowing who I am

The session will provide an opportunity for you to explore and share experiences in a  group setting with others who can more readily relate to your experiences.

The session will be facilitated by Beth Collier who is a mixed raced psychotherapist (see www.centreforemotionalhealth.com/psychotherapy-counselling/therapist-profiles/)

The session will be held at 25 Northumberland Avenue, London, WC2N 5AP, on Monday 2nd July 2012 from 7.00pm-8.45pm.

Cost: £10

To book email Beth at beth@centreforemotionalhealth.com, call 0208 144 0536,  or visit http://www.meetup.com/Mixed-Race-Matters/

 

The session will provide participants with an opportunity to explore and share experiences in a group setting (maximum 6 people).

The benefits of exploring emotions and identity in a group include:


• Sessions are experiential, allowing space for reflection, processing thoughts and feelings about identity
• Gaining different perspectives on similar experiences
• Reflecting with others who can more readily relate to your experiences
• Helps you to acknowledge your own feelings
• Develops understanding of how emotions can shape your worldview and self perception
• Having feelings and experiences acknowledged by others helps develop confidence
• Discover that thoughts, feelings and patterns of behaviour are shared by other people with similar circumstances - you're not alone

Posted in Latest News on 12/06/2012

Mixed Race Matters - 30th January

The Centre for Emotional Health is facilitating a reflective session on Monday 30th January.

Being mixed race is a unique experience which can lead to a rich understanding of race, culture, identity and belonging. This reflective session creates the space to connect with other mixed race people and to share thoughts, feelings and experiences on a range of issues.

The session will follow the themes and discussion raised by its participants, however some example topics we may want to talk about are;

- How you see yourself, how society sees you
- How it feels and what it means to be mixed race
- Labels, which hat fits? Black/Asian/White/Bi-racial/Mixed heritage
- Half and half or whole
- Caught inbetween; family, race and culture
- Belonging; the same but different/Different but the same
- Racism and internalised racism
- Good enough? Compensating for not being white enough/black enough
- Physical appearance, Beauty, Hair, Make up
- Confidence, self esteem, knowing who I am

The session will provide an opportunity for you to explore and share experiences in a therapeutic group setting with others who can more readily relate to your experiences.

The meetup will be facilitated by Beth Collier who is a mixed raced psychotherapist (see www.centreforemotionalhealth.com/psychotherapy-counselling/therapist-profiles/)

The session will be held at 25 Northumberland Avenue, London, WC2N 5AP, on Monday 30th January from 7.00pm-8.45pm.

Cost: £10, to book please contact Beth on 0208 144 0536, beth@centreforemotionalhealth.com or visit http://www.meetup.com/Mixed-Race-Matters/

The session will provide participants with an opportunity to explore and share experiences in a group setting (maximum 6 people).

The benefits of exploring emotions and identity in a group include:


• Sessions are experiential, allowing space for reflection, processing thoughts and feelings about identity
• Gaining different perspectives on similar experiences
• Reflecting with others who can more readily relate to your experiences
• Helps you to acknowledge your own feelings
• Develops understanding of how emotions can shape your worldview and self perception
• Having feelings and experiences acknowledged by others helps develop confidence
• Discover that thoughts, feelings and patterns of behaviour are shared by other people with similar circumstances - you're not alone

Posted in Latest News on 06/01/2012

Mixed Race Matters - Reflective Group

The Centre for Emotional Health is running a series of three reflective group sessions for women exploring mixed race identity.


The group will follow the themes and discussion raised by its participants, however some example topics are:


• How you see yourself, how society sees you
• How it feels and what it means to be a mixed race woman
• Labels, which hat fits? Black/Asian//White/Biracial/Mixed heritage/Mixed race
• Half and half or whole?
• Caught in between; family, race and culture
• Belonging; the same but different/Different but the same?
• Racism and internalised racism
• Good enough? Compensating for not being white enough/black enough
• Hair, beauty, make up
• Confidence, self esteem, knowing who I am


The sessions will provide participants with an opportunity to explore and share experiences in a group setting (maximum 8 people).


The benefits of exploring emotions and identity in a group include:


• Sessions are experiential, allowing space for reflection, processing thoughts and feelings about identity
• Gaining different perspectives on similar experiences
• Reflecting with others who can more readily relate to your experiences
• Helps you to acknowledge your own feelings
• Develops understanding of how emotions can shape your worldview and self perception
• Having feelings and experiences acknowledged by others helps develop confidence
• Discover that thoughts, feelings and patterns of behaviour are shared by other people with similar circumstances - you're not alone


The sessions will be held on 23rd November, 30th November and 7th December from 7.00pm - 8.30pm at 85 Wimpole Street, W1G 9RJ.


Cost: £60 for three sessions
Facilitated by: Beth Collier, MBACP, Psychotherapist


For more information or to book contact Beth; beth@centreforemotionalhealth.com, 0208 144 0536

 

Mixed Race Matters - Reflective Group. flyer
 

Posted in Latest News on 25/10/2011

Lessons in healing from black women's stories

Good mental health means having a positive sense of identity and sense of control over who you are. Mental distress can occur when a person feels overwhelmed by their emotions, life situations and pressures from the society we live in.

The latest briefing from the Centre for Emotional Health, Lessons in healing from black women's stories was commissioned by the Mental Health Foundation.  The briefing summarises black women's experiences of distress, recovery and the role and impact of professionals in healing. Lessons in healing from black women's stories reports that mental health professionals best support an individuals recovery when they engage with an individual's unique personal experiences on an emotional level and listen and learn about the pre-story of distress and its causes, rather than just managaing symptons.

Black women who have experienced mental distress have attributed many causes including family, social and cultural pressures.  Some women had experienced confusion about their identity due to tensions between cultural pressures and personal needs, whereby they felt that they weren’t allowed to be themselves. Many black women are affected by racism and discrimination, others grew up in cultures with strong expectations about women’s roles and behaviour, which they found limiting. Some women felt pressure from their families to hide their distress to avoid bringing shame to the family and disqualifying themselves from social and life events such as marriage.

Read Lessons in healing from black women's stories here.

Posted in Latest News on 17/06/2011

New research: Black women's experiences of distress and recovery

The Centre for Emotional Health has worked in collaboration with the Mental Health Foundation and Survivor Research to document black women’s experiences of mental or emotional distress and recovery.

'Recovery and resilience: African, African-Caribbean and South Asian’s women’s narratives of recovering from mental distress' is based on interviews with 27 women and explores perspectives of ‘mental’ distress and experiences of recovery and resilience.

The research highlights that black women view distress as being caused by a range of issues including personal, family, cultural and bio medical factors. Many women viewed their distress as a valid response to life experiences which included sexual and physical violence, the pressure of responsibilities and limitations placed on them by family and cultural expectations, racism in broader society and in struggling to find a sense of self and positive identity as black women.

For many women recovery meant more than just managing ‘symptoms’ and involved exploring emotions and making sense of the experiences which caused distress. The narratives show that it is important that those supporting women engage with them as an individual and understand their unique circumstances and experiences.

It was important to women that they had space to talk; talking helped relieve symptoms, discharged tension, tackled the causes of distress and helped prevent future distress by developing tools and inner resources to keep themselves healthy. Listening and empathy were described as two of the most powerful and healing interventions that others could make to help support their recovery.


The report was released on 23 March 2011 and is available to download from the Centre for Emotional Health, Mental Health Foundation and Survivor Research.
 

Posted in Latest News on 29/03/2011

The drugs don't work and may cause harm, but prescriptions rise

In March 2011 the New York Times and The Guardian reported on the links between pharmaceutical companies and psychiatrist's over reliance on the prescription of drugs.  The Guardian reports that in the US there is a "widespread practice of paying physicians and psychiatrists heavy subsidies to recommend psycho-pharmaceuticals to their colleagues." 11% of Americans are currently taking leading anti-depressant Prozac, which is just one of 30 on the market. Pharmecutical companies have been instrumental in pathologising emotions as 'diseases' so that they can then market their pills as a magic bullet cure. According to the Guardian, in the US anti-psychotic drugs alone made $14.6 billion for the pharmaceutical industry.  Evidence shows that drugs do not work any better than placebos, and when they do work they only work 25% of the time, further there is evidence that they can cause long term damage. The Guardian reports that "they disrupt brain neurotransmitters and may usurp the brain's organic soothing functions." Evidence shows that Talk therapy is more effective in the long term and does not have harmful side effects, rather talking therapy equips clients with tools which help prevent distress arising again in the future.  Despite evidence on the benefits of talking therapy and the harm caused by drugs, the trend by doctors to prescribe continues. 

The Guardian reports that all 30 anti depressants in the US market have been subject to lawsuits, but little is heard of them as they are often settled with gag clauses.  Pharmaceutical firms have also faced the highest criminal fines ever handed down to corporations for their illegal marketing of anti-psychotic drugs. According to the Guardian, "every major company selling anti-psychotics – Bristol Meyers Squibb, Eli Lilly, Pfizer, Johnson and Johnson and AstraZeneca – has either settled investigations for healthcare fraud or is currently being investigated for it."

Doctors paid to promote a drug by pharmaceutical companies may do so in small meetings with collegaues in which a drug company representative is present, the Guardian reports that "if doubt or criticism of the discussed drug is expressed, the doctor's stipend stops." Further doctors may put their names to 'scholarly' articles written by drug company personel, a practice which is not illegal.  Here the disturbing link between the creation of a 'disease' for which the pharmaceutical company develops a 'cure' can be seen; "Drs Biederman and Wilens netted $1.6m each from drug companies for their work in recommending powerful anti-psychotic drugs for children. Biederman, Wilens and other extremely well-rewarded child psychiatrists are in part responsible for giving children the diagnosis of paediatric bipolar disorder for which anti-psychotic drugs like Risperidal and Zyprexa are used." The New York Times reports that much of Biederman's work is financed by drug companies and helped to fuel a 40% increase in the diagnosis of paeditatric bipolar disorder, between 1994 and 2003.  In 2007, in the US, 500,000 children had been prescribed at least one anti-psychotic.

The New York Times reports that in recent years Psychiatry in the US has become part of a profit making machine dominated by large corporations. Wheras a psychiatrist may have once seen 50-60 patients a week for 45 minuntes of talking based therapy, now a Psychiatrist is more likely to see 1200 clients a week for a 15 minute slot for prescription adjustments. According to the ew York Times, the 'medical' focus is now on keeping people functional rather than happy and fulfilled.  There are also unsetttling links between what insurance companies will cover and the increased prescribing of drugs.  The New York Times reports that despite reports on talking therapies efficiency, in the US a Psychitarist may earn $150 for a 15 minute visit for prescriptions and $90 for a 45 minute therapy session.  Simply put, market conditions - whether organic or manipulated, mean that it doesn't pay for Psychiatrists to offer talking therapies.

 

Original articles: The Guardian, Profiting from mental ill-health, 15 March 2011, www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/cifamerica/2011/mar/15/psychology-healthcare.

The New York Times, Talk doesn't pay, so Psychiatry turns instead to drug therapy, 5 March 2011, www.nytimes.com/2011/03/06/health/policy/06doctors.html?pagewanted=4&_r=1

Posted in Latest News on 21/03/2011

Egypt: UN initiative to support children traumatised by recent violence

UNICEF and local partners in Egypt have launched a psycho-social progamme to support children traumatised by recent violence and uprising which led to the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak.  Children not only witnessed the violence, but there are also reports that they were paid to particpate in counter-demonstrations and detained.  Recent estimates indicate that 365 people were killed and 1000's injured in the unrest.  The programme aims to support to young people in overcoming the psychological distress caused by being exposed to "severe violence, witnessing people killed and badly injured." Under the initiative social workers and teachers are being trained to idenitfy signs of stress and trauma and to provide psychological support, referring on to specialised services where appropriate.

 

Original article: UN News, Egypt: UN launches initiative for children traumatized by recent violence, 23 February 2011, http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=37607&Cr=egypt&Cr1=

Posted in Latest News on 25/02/2011

DR Congo: UN helps provide psychotherapy

As part of a campaign against violence in DRC, 180 women between the ages of 14 and 35 will receive psychotherpay, offered by a joint project between UNICEF and local NGO V-Day. In the last 12 yars and estimated 200,000 women have been raped in the DRC, perpetrated by both rebels and government forces.  Not only have these women been subjected to sexual violence, they have also suffered from social stigma which pressurises men to reject wives who have been raped.

 

Original article: UN News Centre, DR Congo: UN helps provide psychotherapy, training for rape victims, 10 February 2011, http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=37509&Cr=sexual+violence&Cr1

Posted in Latest News on 14/02/2011

Social workers' demanding role requires emotional resilience

Emotional resilience is a key theme within the latest report, Building a Safe and Confident Future; One Year On , from the Social Work Reform Board (SWRB) describing the profession as an “emotionally demanding job” requiring “stamina, emotional resilience and determination“ to work with client groups with complex and changing needs.

Recent research by Kinman and Grant published in the British Social Work Journal on resilience to stress amongst trainees reported that social workers "tend to report higher levels of work-related stress and burnout than many other occupational groups" and further that "the high levels of stress and burnout endemic to social work have been found to contribute to the current retention problems in the UK."

Under new SWRB proposals, Continuing Professional Development should support social workers to “become more confident, emotionally resilient and adaptable to the changing demands of social work.”

Amongst other professional capabilities the SWRB report, encourages the “use of self/emotional resilience“ and requires professionals to be “an effective social worker while also promoting and protecting personal well-being.”

Kinman and Grant found that trainees with the ability to reflect on thoughts, feelings and beliefs were more likely to be resilient to stress, the research findings "highlight the value of reflection as a self-protective mechanism as well as a way of enhancing professional practice."

For original reports see: Social Work Reform Board, Building a Safe and Confident Future; One Year On, December 2010, Kinman and Grant, (July 2010) Exploring Stress Resilience in Trainee Social Workers: The Role of Emotional and Social Competencies, British Journal of Social Work , Oxford Univeristy Press
 

Posted in Latest News on 11/02/2011

Psychotherapy for human rights professionals

Psychotherapy for human rights professionals and those working with traumatised clients. The Centre for Emotional Health specialises in working with professionals who work with traumatised client groups, including those in humanitarian, human rights, social work and related fields.

Looking after you, whilst you look after others
Working with people who have experienced hardship and abuse can take its toll on your own emotional health. Counselling is a supportive way of maintaining your well-being and ensuring that emotional content generated by your work has an outlet, preventing the build up of tension which can become overwhelming. Counselling can support you to support others and help keep you resilient.

Well being at work
Its important to give yourself the space to reflect on the impact of your work on your emotional life, to prevent burnt out and stress.

Why do I do what I do?
Explore how formative personal experiences relate to the work that we’re attracted to and help make sense of your clients experiences.


For more informaiton or to book sessions please contact us on 0208 144 0536 or email beth@centreforemotionalhealth.com.

Posted in Latest News on 09/02/2011

Global Attitudes to Emotional Health

Nepal: Mental health care neglected, 8 Feb 2010

UN humanitarian news agency, IRIN, reports that according to the Nepalise government, 20% of the Nepali population had symptoms of mental illness in 2010. In a 10 month period in 2010 police recorded 7,300 cases of suicide nationwide, more than half of these were women. Local NGO, Centre for Mental Health and Counselling-Nepal, reported that, "This is a major public health concern and we still do not have a proper mental health care system in place.”

The Nepalise govement first formulated its mental health policy in 1996, but according to local NGO's has not been fully implemented. IRIN rstates that, "The key components of the policy included ensuring access to all minimum MH services, training MH human resources, protecting human rights of the mentally ill, and improving awareness about this public health issue." 

IRIN reports a lack of government funded clinical mental health facilities, "Only one government run health centre, Patan Hospital in Kathmandu, offers outpatient MH care. There are no inpatient or outpatient MH services in any other government-run health facilities in the country. "

The founder of the Nepal Mental Health Foundation reported that access to medical treatment is minial and costs prohibitive, IRIN states that  "Only a negligible number of patients have free government-subsidized access to psychotropic drugs, one form of medical treatment [  ]. The cost of anti-psychotic medication is high in Nepal and unaffordable for most affected families. "  Consequently many families impoverish themselves buying anti-psychotic drrugs or travelling abroad to access medical treatment. Only a small amount of NGO's are able to offer free treatment, focused on psycho-social counselling.

Original article: IRIN, Nepal: Mental health care neglected, 30 December 2010, http://www.irinnews.org/report.aspx?ReportId=91490

Posted in Latest News on 09/02/2011

> Latest News

Nature Based Psychotherapy - CPD Workshops

Nature Based Psychotherapy Moving your practice into natural settings 5 day CPD Training 29 September – 27 October 2014 The…

Read More ›

Reflective Group for professionals working with distressed clients, 3rd Sept

The group will provide a space for professionals who have contact with people who are in distress or suffering hardship…

Read More ›

Outdoor meditation sessions, Wednesdays 5.15pm

From 16th July 2014 Wild in the City! will be running regular outdoor meditation sessions. This sensory meditation group will…

Read More ›

Outdoor therapeutic group, 'Finding my voice,' starting 16 July 2014

An outdoor therapeutic group for women on the theme of ‘Finding My Voice,’ will be held in the gardens of…

Read More ›

Walk and Talk - Counselling sessions in woodland

Walk and Talk counselling sessions in Sydenham Hill Woods Traditionally therapy sessions take place within the four walls of a…

Read More ›

Mixed Race Matters - 2nd July 2012

The Centre for Emotional Health is facilitating a reflective session on Monday 2nd July 2012. Being mixed race is a…

Read More ›

Mixed Race Matters - 30th January

The Centre for Emotional Health is facilitating a reflective session on Monday 30th January. Being mixed race is a unique…

Read More ›

Mixed Race Matters - Reflective Group

The Centre for Emotional Health is running a series of three reflective group sessions for women exploring mixed race identity.…

Read More ›

Lessons in healing from black women's stories

Good mental health means having a positive sense of identity and sense of control over who you are. Mental distress…

Read More ›

New research: Black women's experiences of distress and recovery

The Centre for Emotional Health has worked in collaboration with the Mental Health Foundation and Survivor Research to document black…

Read More ›

The drugs don't work and may cause harm, but prescriptions rise

In March 2011 the New York Times and The Guardian reported on the links between pharmaceutical companies and psychiatrist's over…

Read More ›

Egypt: UN initiative to support children traumatised by recent violence

UNICEF and local partners in Egypt have launched a psycho-social progamme to support children traumatised by recent violence and uprising…

Read More ›

DR Congo: UN helps provide psychotherapy

As part of a campaign against violence in DRC, 180 women between the ages of 14 and 35 will receive…

Read More ›

Social workers' demanding role requires emotional resilience

Emotional resilience is a key theme within the latest report, Building a Safe and Confident Future; One Year On ,…

Read More ›

Psychotherapy for human rights professionals

Psychotherapy for human rights professionals and those working with traumatised clients. The Centre for Emotional Health specialises in working with…

Read More ›

Global Attitudes to Emotional Health

Nepal: Mental health care neglected, 8 Feb 2010 UN humanitarian news agency, IRIN, reports that according to the Nepalise government,…

Read More ›